Don’t just chuck your tree away, make a big cat happy!

<h1>Here's Zuri the lion enjoying a Christmas tree at Linton Zoo.</h1>

Here's Zuri the lion enjoying a Christmas tree at Linton Zoo.

Linton Zoo

<h1>Its director, Kim Simmons, <a href="http://bbc.in/1IgApWZ">told</a> the BBC that the trees are "like catnip".</h1>


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The broadcaster reported: "Catnip, sometimes known at catmint, is a plant of the mint family and can cause many cats euphoria."

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<h1>The zoo has put out an appeal for more trees.</h1>


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Before you throw your Christmas trees on the rubbish pile please spare us a thought. Greenery is very important to our animals, so live rooted and growing trees can be given a second chance at life by being planted in one of our animal enclosures or our new woodland area.

Trees without roots are used to decorate our aviaries and as enrichment for many of our animals including the lions, tigers and snow leopards.


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